Tag Archives: strontium

Collecting Uranium

Filed under Radiation, Science
Tagged as , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

!!!The most important aspects of safety!!!

Key things to reduce exposure:
1. Shielding
2. Time (of exposure)
3. Distance

Key things to keep safe:
1. Minimize exposure if possible.
2. Always wash hands and wear gloves.
3. Never allow inhalation or ingestion of dust from samples.
4. Keep samples away from children (anyone, actually) and only bring
5. Never store samples under your bed (not sure why they do, but apparently people do this lol)

Good books:
Introduction to Radioactive Minerals – Robert Lauf

Places to buy uranium:
minresco.com
UnitedNuclear.com

(eBay and Amazon have some too, but be careful!)

Places to get equipment:

Carolina.com
GeigerCounters.com
www.minresco.com

Places to get a Geiger counter (including recommended models):

Model 3 + 44-9 Pancake Probe – Ludlums.com
Inspector – GeigerCounters.com
PRM9000 – GeigerCounters.com
CDV700 – VArious places (careful of bad units… may need repair and claibration)

Spectrum Techniques Universal Computer Spectrometer UCS30 – A Review and Overview

Filed under Radiation, Science
Tagged as , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A nice little unit, the UCS30 comes with 512, 1024, 2048, or 4096 channels. The unit has a built-in high voltage source and a pre-amplifier.

There are many great and wonderful scientific devices which we can obtain and use to understand our world. The most important things we can do in our lives are to learn all that we can and teach as much as possible to all who will listen.

The unit can be seen at http://spectrumtechniques.com/

Oh… and no, they didn’t ask or pay me to show off their unit. Unfortunately, I had to buy the unit myself 🙂

A Demonstration of Nuclear Radiation

Filed under Radiation, Science
Tagged as , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A quick demonstration of nuclear radiation. Just for fun and maybe even a little education. =)

Published In Microbe Hunter Magazine!

Filed under Radiation, Science
Tagged as , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

WOW! I got published again in Microbe Hunter magazine!

© 2012 Natural Uranium

Autunite Uranium under long wave UV light

My samples of Uranium taken under a microscope were recently published in the September 2012 edition of Microbe Hunter magazine! Don’t forget to check out my previous published work in the same magazine, Microscopy Meets Gamma Spectroscopy – Modern Day Alchemy

Cesium 137 Detected in my Rain! (Radioactive Rain Detected)

Filed under Radiation, Science
Tagged as , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

As you all know, I have always maintained that there is Fukushima fallout in the rain… but that the levels (even if they are unsafe) are too low for a Geiger counter to detect.

My sensitive Gamma Spectrometer has now (I believe) detected Cs137 in a rain water collection bucket which concentrates, or so it seems, the Cs137.

Most of the radiation detected by Geiger counters from rain is from Radon Washout, a processes whereby radon in the air (decays from natural uranium around the world) is “washed” out and falls to the ground in the rain. The decay chain is sudden and very quick, providing a few hours of potent readings before falling to background.

Inspector (regular or EXP) Sensitivity to Iodine 125:

0.02 µCi = 740Bq = 44,400Bq/60seconds
(At contact for I-125)

http://seintl.com/products/inspectorplusEXP.html

Iodine -125 Electron Capture
Gamma – 35.49 keV 6.60 %
X-Ray – 27.47 keV 75.7 %

http://ie.lbl.gov/toi/nuclide.asp?iZA=530125

Best energy range for detection by LND7317 probe:
10 keV = 100 keV (max)

The range where detector efficency falls rapidly (Cs137 is also in this range):
100 keV = 1000 keV (declining)

http://seintl.com/images/InspEnResponseC137_large.jpg

A great place to find data on isotopes:
http://ie.lbl.gov/toi/

*** Update! ****

I have calculated the activity:

My original calibrated Cs137 source (cal. vs. NIST tracible source, source ID SRS:80899-854, at 95% accuracy) was 3737 Bq.

I accounted for decay of the source:
3737*e^-((ln(2)/10979)*173) = 3696.4059560683608390980241545539265887454856828520474 Bq
=3696 Bq

For an ROI of the same size for both calibrated sample and rain water sample, I ran tests and determined counts per second:

Calibrated Source 91.2633 c/s
Rain Water Sample: 0.01439814814814814814814814814815 c/s

Now, I divided the detected calibrated sample c/s into the expected c/s to determine ratio of emission vs detection for the energies around 661.66 keV. (3696Bq * 0.851 [intensity for gamma from Ba137m])/2 = 1572.648. The division by two is because I entirely detected one side of the thin sample disk. so… 91.2633 / 1572.648 = 0.05803161292291727074335769987944

My detector is only about 5.8% efficient for such energies. (lower than my 12% “ball park by half”)

Now, merely divide the counted detection from rain by the efficiency and you have about the correct result.
(311counts/21600) /0.05803142216185694446564011781403 =

=0.01439814814814814814814814814815 / 0.05803142216185694446564011781403 = 0.24810951742643665986093914169915

Or 0.248 Bq/liter

(that is zero point two four eight Becquerels per liter)

Thoughts?